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Armament technicians repair F-16 Gatling Gun

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, works on a clearing solenoid at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood had to completely replace the clearing solenoid because it was damaged beyond repair. This piece of equipment places the round in the clearing cam path of a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun. Every 18 months they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, works on a clearing solenoid at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood had to completely replace the clearing solenoid because it was damaged beyond repair. This piece of equipment places the round in the clearing cam path of a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun. Every 18 months they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood and Airman 1st Class John Williams, both 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technicians, work on breach bolts at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pull it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood and Airman 1st Class John Williams, both 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technicians, work on breach bolts at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pull it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, tightens a wire on a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood along with other Airmen performed an 18-month inspection on the system ensuring all the components were in working order. Every 18-months they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, tightens a wire on a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood along with other Airmen performed an 18-month inspection on the system ensuring all the components were in working order. Every 18-months they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

A M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun sits on a stand while U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood and Airman 1st Class John Williams, both 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technicians, work on breach bolts at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pulls it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

A M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun sits on a stand while U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood and Airman 1st Class John Williams, both 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technicians, work on breach bolts at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pulls it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. 35th Fighter Wing Airmen integrated into the Kunsan team to continue operations while the Misawa runway is under construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, tightens a wire on a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood installed the firing contacts on the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun which provides the electrical signal to the rounds so the rounds fire. Every 18 months they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, tightens a wire on a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Wood installed the firing contacts on the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun which provides the electrical signal to the rounds so the rounds fire. Every 18 months they completely break down the M61A1 and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components. 35th Fighter Wing Airmen integrated into the Kunsan team to continue operations while the Misawa runway is under construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, looks at a technical operation on the breach bolt at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pulls it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Wood, a 35th Maintenance Squadron armament technician, looks at a technical operation on the breach bolt at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 15, 2017. Breach bolts pull the round into the rotor, pulling it forward so it can fire then pulls it back. This was a part of an 18-month inspection where they completely break down the M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun and rebuild it, repairing or replacing any components that have been damaged. 35th Fighter Wing Airmen integrated into the Kunsan team to continue operations while the Misawa runway is under construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany A. Chase)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing, from Misawa Air Base, Japan, traveled to the 8th FW, at Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea, to continue operations while the Misawa AB runway undergoes repairs May 15.

During this time armament technicians with the 35th and 8th Maintenance Squadrons integrated, allowing Airmen to work side-by-side to continue each wing’s mission.

Although Airmen are not at their home station, they still adhere to all monthly inspections, including a routine 18-month inspection of a M61A1 20mm Gatling Gun that arose, which requires Airmen to completely break down and rebuild it, cleaning, re-lubing, repairing or replacing any components which have been damaged.

Normally while at a home station, breaking down the M61A1 only takes two to four people but while at a temporary duty location, it can take anywhere from seven to eight, averaging around a week to completely accomplish the task.