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Combat Dining-In Rules of Engagement

ANDERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- Airman 1st Class Nathan Fitzwater, a Fire and Emergency Services member from the 36th Civil Engineering Squadron, 36th Air Expeditionary Wing, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, conceals himself by camouflaging in palm leaves and face paint during a Combat Dining In on Jan. 29, 2005. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III)

ANDERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- Airman 1st Class Nathan Fitzwater, a Fire and Emergency Services member from the 36th Civil Engineering Squadron, 36th Air Expeditionary Wing, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, conceals himself by camouflaging in palm leaves and face paint during a Combat Dining In on Jan. 29, 2005. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III)


Kunsan Combat Dining-In

The Combat Dining-In is a tradition in all branches of the United States Armed services. From pre-Christian Roman legions, to second century Viking warlords, to King Arthur's knights in the sixth century, feasts to honor military victories and individual and unit achievements have been a custom.

Some trace the origins of the dining-in to the old English monasteries. The custom was then taken up by the early universities and eventually adopted by the military. With the adoption of the dining-in by the military, these dinners became more formalized. British soldiers brought the custom to colonial America, where it was borrowed by George Washington's continental army.

The purpose of the Kunsan Combat Dining-In is to bring together members of the Wolf Pack in an atmosphere of camaraderie, good fellowship, and social rapport. It serves to enhance the esprit de corps, lightens the load of demanding day-to-day work, gives the commander an opportunity to meet socially with their subordinates and enables military members of all ranks to create bonds of friendship and better working relations through an atmosphere of good fellowship.

1. Thou shall NEVER question any decisions made by the President; he/she is always right.
2. Thou shall be present at the social hour before the President arrives and make every effort to meet all guests.
3. Thou shall ensure thy clothing is militant in nature, deviations from 36-2903 (in good taste) are encouraged.
4. Thou shall not smoke in the combat area.
5. Thou shall not take his/her place at the table until the President so directs.
6. Thou shall not be late for dinner. Should a member be late for dinner he/she must go to the President, offer his/her apologies and request permission to take a seat.
7. Thou shall not prop elbows on the table when eating.
8. Thou shall direct all points of order to the Sergeants at Arms (Hate Train members).
9. Thou shall ensure thy cup is always charged when toasting, and thou shall only toast with water in memory of POW/MIA.
10. Thou shall keep toasts and comments within limits of good taste (no profanity) and mutual respect, however, good-natured humor is ENCOURAGED.
11. Thou shall not open the hangar doors (talk about work).
12. Thou shall express approval by tapping thy silverware, dog tag, or fist on the table. Clapping of hands will not be tolerated.
13. Thou shall be permitted to initiate combat when ever alarm blue is declared and prepare to defend your combat area.
14. Thou shall cease combat as soon as alarm green is declared.
15. If a member of the mess calls for a "cease fire," respect their wishes. All members serving in an official capacity (photographers/videographers) are protected from combat under LOAC.
16. Thou shall come to battle prepared for war with all necessary gear of your choosing.
17. Thou shall not point with thy finger for it is of poor taste.
18. Thou shall not over-indulge thyself in alcoholic beverages.
19. Thou shall have thy RMO (Round Metal Object) accessible at all times.
20. THOU SHALL ENJOY THYSELF TO THE FULLEST!